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Category »Rhythm Remarks«

24 March 2014

Rhythm Remarks with Elliot Earls

Rhythm Remarks wraps up this week with Elliot Earls. Earls is Artist-in-Residence and head of the Graduate Graphic Design Department at Cranbrook Academy of Art. His work as a designer, performer, and artist is represented in major collections including the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, The Wolfsonian Museum, and The Miami Art Museum.

 

TYPO Talks: How is rhythm reflected in your work?

Elliot Earls: Music and performance has been an integral part of my work throughout my career. Rhythm is a major component of music.

TT: How do you get into your creative rhythm?

EE: Never get out of it.

TT: What speakers are you most looking forward to meeting or hearing talk at TYPO SF?

EE: Emory Douglas.

TT: If you haven’t visited SF before, what are you most looking forward to experiencing? If you are familiar with San Francisco, do you have a favorite hangout?

EE: The Japanese Tea Garden in Golden Gate Park is beautiful.

TT: What’s your favorite typeface and why?

EE: Typhoid Mary 3D Light, because it was a foundational component of my work.

 

Register today to see Elliot Earls and all of our inspirational speakers at TYPO San Francisco 2014.

17 March 2014

Rhythm Remarks with George Zisiadis

Rhythm Remarks is back again with our next speaker, George Zisiadis. Zisiadis is an interactive artist and designer who’s interdisciplinary projects playfully re-imagine the everyday and inspire people to see the world in new ways.

 

TYPO Talks: How is rhythm reflected in your work?

George Zisiadis: Constant movement and experimentation is key. I try and keep the rhythm of at least one public project every month or so. Following a structured rhythm like that helps keep my creative process and energy on track.

TT: How do you get into your creative rhythm?

GZ: Freewriting every morning is key to clearing my mind and crystallizing all the thoughts bouncing around there into coherent ideas. It allows me to hit my creative work running.

TT: What speakers are you most looking forward to meeting or hearing talk at TYPO SF?

GZ: Everyone is great but definitely Maria Popova. Brain Pickings should be required reading for the entire internet.

TT: If you haven’t visited SF before, what are you most looking forward to experiencing? If you are familiar with San Francisco, do you have a favorite hangout?

GZ: Alamo Square Park!

TT: What’s your favorite typeface and why?

GZ: Futura. Eternally classy.

 

Register today to see George Zisiadis and all of our inspirational speakers at TYPO San Francisco 2014.

 

10 March 2014

Rhythm Remarks with Gemma O’Brien

In this edition of Rhythm Remarks we catch up with Sydney’s Gemma O’BrienO’Brien is a typographer, hand-letterer, and illustrator who has been on FontShop’s radar since her experimental video in which she covered her body with hand lettering.

 

TYPO Talks: How is rhythm reflected in your work?

Gemma O’Brien: Writing and hand lettering is very much driven by rhythm, both aesthetically and the process of crafting it. The contrast and variation of brushstrokes in my work as well as the physical movement of the hand are a couple of ways rhythm is present in my work.

TT: How do you get into your creative rhythm?

GO: After having worked in larger creative companies doing the 9-5 thing, I know it doesn’t work for me. I like flexibility and freedom to go outdoors during the day and ride my bike or go for a swim. I will then work for at least 10 hours after the sun goes down… usually until about 4am. When I have the time and space to experiment and explore lots of ideas is when my creative rhythm is at its peak. Of course, with the reality of commercial deadlines, this isn’t always possible.

TT: What speakers are you most looking forward to meeting or hearing talk at TYPO SF?

GO: I find myself wanting to retweet almost every single one of Brain Picking’s tweets so I’d have to say Maria Popova.

TT: If you haven’t visited SF before, what are you most looking forward to experiencing? If you are familiar with San Francisco, do you have a favorite hangout?

GO: I’ve briefly been once before a few years ago so I’m exciting to come back and spend a bit more time in San Fran. I do remember a guy sitting at Haight Ashbury typing love poems on his typewriter. The ultimate hipster!  I’m keen to do some hiking but I’m up for all kinds of adventures so hit me up with your suggestions!

TT: What’s your favorite typeface and why?

GO: Given that it was the story behind this typeface that sparked a further interest in typography and became my moniker for my blog, it has to be Mrs Eaves!

 

Register today to see Gemma O’Brien and all of our inspirational speakers at TYPO San Francisco 2014.

3 March 2014

Rhythm Remarks with Dan Rhatigan

Rhythm Remarks is back again with Dan Rhatigan. Rhatigan is a typeographer, typeface designer, and the UK type director for Monotype. He has also taught part-time at the ArtEZ Institute of the Arts in the Netherlands.

 

TYPO Talks: How is rhythm reflected in your work?

Dan Rhatigan: Working on typefaces is a real stop-and-go process, as I rarely know at the start everything that will need to be a part of the final result. My way of working requires time to set a design aside to reflect and forget it a little bit, punctuated by bursts of intense activity so I can hold all the variable in my head at once.

TT: How do you get into your creative rhythm?

DR: With great difficulty. The reflective part is easy: that often happens as I drift off to sleep, or when I’ve been distracted enough by other tasks that I can back away from what I’ve been drawing. Getting into the focused, productive state of mind for working on type, though, requires a chunk of time without interruptions. I’ll often start with repetitive, low-level things like checking the positions of accent marks as a warm-up to ease me into the more productive state of mind.

TT: What speakers are you most looking forward to meeting or hearing talk at TYPO SF?

DR: I’m really looking forward to Emmet Byrne, since I was really impressed with the Walker Art Center when I finally got to visit during the AIGA conference this past Fall: they’re up to some great stuff. I’m also a big fan of Rene Knip’s typographic work, so his talk ought to be a real treat.

TT: If you haven’t visited SF before, what are you most looking forward to experiencing? If you are familiar with San Francisco, do you have a favorite hangout?

DR: Kayo Books on Post Street has an unbelievable selection of vintage pulp paperbacks, and I need to stock up!

TT: What’s your favorite typeface and why?

DR: I definitely don’t have ONE favorite, but I usually have a shortlist of them that slowly changes. I’m thinking a lot about eccentric san serifs from the 19th century lately (such as the various sources for families like Monotype Grotesque), since I’m interested in alternatives to smoothly graded type superfamilies.

 

Register today to see Dan Rhatigan and all of our inspirational speakers at TYPO San Francisco 2014.

24 February 2014

Rhythm Remarks with Denise Gonzales Crisp

Today Denise Gonzales Crisp joins us for another edition of Rhythm Remarks. Crisp is a graphic designer and Professor of Graphic Design at North Carolina State University, who calls both Los Angeles and Raleigh home.

 

TYPO Talks: How is rhythm reflected in your work?

Denise Gonzales Crisp: I’ve created and used patterns in my work since 1998. I still love them!

TT: How do you get into your creative rhythm?

DGC: First focus on something essential, like the structure or a broad stroke feeling. As I work, I then find the more expressive aspects.

TT: What speakers are you most looking forward to meeting or hearing talk at TYPO SF?

DGC: Oh so many. Maybe most particularly Gabriel Martinez Meave–a brilliant calligrapher and type designer; and Rene Knip because I’ve always been a fan, and of course Moscoso!

TT: If you haven’t visited SF before, what are you most looking forward to experiencing? If you are familiar with San Francisco, do you have a favorite hangout?

DGC: Green Apple Books

TT: What’s your favorite typeface and why?

DGC: Not Helvetica. I love Liza Pro (Underware) because it is beautifully drawn, and computationally magical.

 

Register today to see Denise Gonzales Crisp and all of our inspirational speakers at TYPO San Francisco 2014.

17 February 2014

Rhythm Remarks with David Jonathan Ross

This week Rhythm Remarks is chatting with David Jonathan Ross. David teaches typeface design at the Art Institute of Boston and practices what he preaches. He’s the guy behind such fonts as Turnip, Condor, and Trilby – all available at FontShop.

 

TYPO Talks: How is rhythm reflected in your work?

David Jonathan Ross: Drawing a really good-looking letter is nice, but the real challenge of my job is figuring out the system: how to draw letters that can be repeated without getting boring, mixed and matched in any arrangement, and woven into a text that erupts in a rhythm of black and white.

TT: How do you get into your creative rhythm?

DJR: For me, getting into creative rhythm is all about getting out of mundane patterns. I’m not sure I would get anything done if I worked 9–5, and wasn’t able to break up my day with meals with my girlfriend and hikes with my dogs.

TT: What speakers are you most looking forward to meeting or hearing talk at TYPO SF?

DJR: Not sure where to start. I’ve admired Aaron Draplin’s work for some time, but have never met him or seen him speak. And I’ve seen Yanone speak and get a kick out of him. This will be my first TYPO (Berlin, San Francisco, wherever) so I’m really just excited to see what it is like.

TT: If you haven’t visited SF before, what are you most looking forward to experiencing? If you are familiar with San Francisco, do you have a favorite hangout?

DJR: The last time I was in San Francisco was probably close to a decade ago. I plan on spending most of my time hanging out near the conference. I’m hoping I’ll have time to do some sightseeing driving up Pacific Coast Highway from Los Angeles.

TT: What’s your favorite typeface and why?

DJR: Estro, by Aldo Novarese. I was always taught that a typeface should have one central idea in it. But Estro has a ton of things going on — the reverse stress, the movement, the bounciness — and pulls it off so well.

 

Register today to see David Jonathan Ross and all of our inspirational speakers at TYPO San Francisco 2014.

(Photo courtesy of David Sudweeks)

10 February 2014

Rhythm Remarks with Aaron James Draplin

It’s Monday which means it’s time for another edition in our Rhythm Remarks blog series, giving you a peek into the minds of our speakers for TYPO SF 2014.

This week we focus on Aaron James Draplin, a Portland, Oregon based graphic designer and art director.

 

TYPO Talks: How is rhythm reflected in your work?

Aaron James Draplin: Solid hierarchies, pragmatic color palettes, straightforward thick lines and freedom from chaff. And working hard to keep it all going.

TT: How do you get into your creative rhythm?

AJD: Memories of shitty summer jobs and other hellish work experiences. Those are a good kick in the ass each morning. I’m never going back to that shit. And, a good night of sleep helps.

TT: What speakers are you most looking forward to meeting or hearing talk at TYPO SF?

AJD: Excited to shake the revolutionary hand of Emory Douglas! Fired up to hear Josh Higgins’s talk!

TT: If you haven’t visited SF before, what are you most looking forward to experiencing? If you are familiar with San Francisco, do you have a favorite hangout?

AJD: Weirdo record stores. So much obscure vinyl in that city!

TT: What’s your favorite typeface and why?

AJD: Futura Bold. Defied the Nazis! Clean, geometric and scales well. An underdog typeface relegated to catalogs and manuals and other throw-away items. And all the while, it works hard and does a hell of a job! A beautiful underdog.

 

Register today to see Aaron Jason Draplin and all of our inspirational speakers at TYPO San Francisco 2014.

3 February 2014

Rhythm Remarks with Yanone

Today we bring you Rhythm Remarks – the first in a series of blog posts introducing you to some of the talented speakers on the roster for TYPO SF 2014 Rhythm.

First up is German based graphic artist and type designer Yanone. Yanone is the designer behind FF Kava or FF Amman Sans and FF Amman Serif, all available from FontShop.

 

TYPO Talks: How is rhythm reflected in your work?

Yanone: Making a dance music film for a typeface counts as something with rhythm in it, innit?

TT: How do you get into your creative rhythm?

Yanone: Taking time off and letting loose is my most important source of creativity. I had most of my best ideas form on festivals, far away from any work desk.

TT: What speakers are you most looking forward to meeting or hearing talk at TYPO SF?

Yanone: Having heard of almost none of the speakers before this is a tough one to answer. I’d love to hear Emory Douglas speak. I guess I’ll simply keep my mind open and meet these people.

TT: If you haven’t visited SF before, what are you most looking forward to experiencing? If you are familiar with San Francisco, do you have a favorite hangout?

Yanone: I’ve seen a bit of San Francisco during my visit to the first TYPO SF two years ago. Mission seemed very welcoming. This time I want to see more of California before the conference.

TT: What’s your favorite typeface and why?

Yanone: DIN, because it’s the most undesigned typeface ever made — a concept that seems to be a contradiction in terms.

 

Register today to see Yanone and all of our inspirational speakers at TYPO San Francisco 2014.