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19 October 2012

Lucienne Roberts joined by Rebecca Wright

Lucienne Roberts, photo © Jason Wen
Lucienne Roberts at TYPO London 2012 photo by Jason Wen

Coming from a practical Graphic Design background describes her job as a non solo occupation. Moreover the + sign in her studio name indicates the importance of being socially connected in practice. 

Talking about her influences such as political activism as well as feminism she quotes Woody Allen, who describes work as ‘a quality distraction’. A portrait of Allen on her desk inspires her to follow this approach. 

When Ken Garland published his manifesto ‘First things first’ it expressed the importance to take on social responsibility for her work and this is clearly what she does.

Presenting her work as well as their social aspects of it in a series of case studies she reveals that not only the subject matter itself is important but also the combination of client, public engagement, sustainability and educational expression.

Recently she collaborates with Rebecca Wright to form ‘Graphic Design &’ to build a platform that questions how graphic design can connect to other subjects.

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19 October 2012

Sara de Bondt: The Office of Statistics

Photo © Gerhard Kassner

 

Sara de Bondt is a Belgian graphic designer based in London. Her talk at TYPO was divided into three sections:

1. How can work itself be social?

With her exhibition design for RADICAL NATURE at the Barbican in 2009 she was trying to learn a lot from her research. Therefore she set up a manifesto of what sustainable, green graphic design is (which ink and paper should be used, dealing cleverly with resources,…). For the exhibition, they were recycling interior from former exhibitions. New furniture was constructed without power tools. Instead of gluing exhibition captions to the wall, they were just using nails. Since the Barbican’s archive was full of unused posters, they decided to use the reverse of those (which is in general blue) for creating a new poster series for their exhibition. The catalogue of the show was printed in a very low edition, every extra catalogue that was requested was printed on demand. Sara managed to keep the resources for this exhibition very low and in that sense green.

2.

For the artissima 18 art fair in Turin, they experienced that graphic design itself can be social. Instead of catching people’s attention with images or simple type posters, they decided to come up with in depth information. An artificial company was created that was growing and generating data, based on the recent and past artissima Art fairs. The information was presented to the public on posters, invites, flyers, even on the facade of the venue. Information was revealed in unusual ways. Playfull statistics brought artists and gallerys to the centre of attention. With the result that visitors have been very interested in understanding and reading the offered information, and enabled a vivid interaction.

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19 October 2012

Social Storytelling with Visual Editions

© Jason Wen

To kick off the TYPO London program in Jeffrey Hall, facilitator Simone Wolf introduced Visual EditionsAnna Gerber and Britt Iversen as pair that likes “working with talented people and being told something is impossible.”

Over the next 40 minutes, Gerber and Iversen showed the TYPO audience how they’ve married design and literature to create, as their strapline states, “great looking stories” in an “chaotic, oftentimes frustrating process, but that’s where the magic comes  in.”

Publishing house Visual Editions is four books old. Bursting into life in Winter 2010, with an APFEL-designed “punked up” version of British classic Tristram Shandy, they introduced a unique approach of producing a shared experience for different types of audiences and instigating conversations about how you read. Simultaneous exhibitions of the book at both the Design Museum and Shandy Hall on the same day underscored this juxtaposition.

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19 October 2012

Anthony Burrill: Working Hard and Being Nice to People

Anthony Burrill, photo © Gerhard Kassner

Anthony Burrill describes himself as a ‘persuasive, up-beat illustrator and designer’. Today at TYPO London, the softly spoken man took us on a fantastic journey through his eclectic career to date; regaling stories of letter-pressing in the “ancient” town of Rye, printing a poster using the crude oil from the disastrous BP spill of 2006 BP and why we should “Work Hard and Be Nice to People”.

In fact, it is easy to believe that Burrill himself lives by this very motto. On stage, Burrill’s softly spoken personality embodies the sentiment of possibly his best-known work (the “Work Hard and Be Nice To People” poster). Drawn from an old saying Burrill heard, the poster went on to be a huge viral hit across the globe. Freely admitting to often ‘Googling himself’ (after all, who doesn’t?), Burrill showed us a glimpse of the reach of the poster – “from Mums to fashion bloggers”
and even one individual getting a tattoo of the design.

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19 October 2012

TYPO London 2012 has commenced!

The seats of Logan Hall and the those of the second stage at Jeffery Hall are taken. Opening speakers Sara De Bondt in the main hall and Anna Gerber & Britt Iversen from Visual Editions on the second stage kicked off this year’s TYPO London conference. Today and tomorrow more than 30 speakers will investigate the social impact on design.

Typo London 2012, "Social" Sara De Bondt

Sara De Bondt opening this year’s TYPO London conference with her speach “The Office of Statistics“, photo by Gerhard Kassner

There will be a live streaam for those who can not make ist this year:  At twelve o’clock you can watch Anthony Burrill’s speach “Working Hard and Being Nice to People” at or live stream site. There will be further covering of the conference to which everyone is invited to follow or to contribute. Select your favourite channel to follow the two day summit:

For the spontaneous: There are some day passes left for today or tomorrow. TYPO London takes place at the Institute of Education LondonUniversity of London.

17 October 2012

Four (or so) Questions to … Béa Beste

beste-web

 How do we have to learn today? What do our children need in order to be well prepared for the future? Where is “I”, where is “We”? Béa Beste collected ideas and impressions of an educational expedition on three continents. Education is her vocation.

After studying business engineering and social and economic communication she joined SAT1 Television, moved on to Boston Consulting Group and subsequently established the bilingual schools of Phorms Education in Berlin in 2005. Béas concept focuses on learning in a community with global education in local schools where each individual respects the other.

After CEOing her school for six years, Béa embarked on an educational expedition to India, Australia, Indonesia, and the USA in 2011. Inspired by the diversity of educational methodologies on an international scale, she began to develop PlayDUcation, a system to combine the worlds of learning and playing.

Béa will lead us to where »business« and »social« overlap and grants an amazing insight into how our brain runs on fun.

 

1. Which work are you particularly proud of? Which work best represents your style or approach?

I’m a school founder, my biggest achievements is a chain of bilingual schools across Germany. My current new project is tollabox, we just went online! It’s a monthly box designed for families with children aged 4-8. It fosters the natural creativity and curiosity! It’s learning by play: playducation.

An example for the contents of a Tollabox © www.tollabox.de

 

2. The theme of this year’s TYPO London is »Social«. Do you consider design to be a social discipline? Which design project do you consider to be particularly socially relevant?

Design is a way of thinking, shaping the world and communicating. I’m highly impressed by the Design Thinking School of the Hasso Plattner Institute. I’m a great admirer of schools designed to revolutionize education – like the Sydney Centre for innovation in Learning, High Tech High, or the Vittra Schools in Sweden.

 

3. A conference like TYPO London is in itself an obvious example for a social event: what are you especially looking forward to?

Visual impressions. New ways to see. People. Ideas. The Unexpected.

 

4. Required reading/watching: What are currently your favorite interesting/beautiful publications, exhibitions, books, movies and/or websites?


17 October 2012

Four (or so) Questions to … Ken Garland

Since 1962 Ken Garland equipped the British movement for Nuclear Disarment with a visual message and he became a devoted adherent to the campaign, that never earned him a single penny. In 1963 he wrote and proclaimed the The First Things First manifesto »in favour of the more useful and more lasting forms of communication« and demanded »Reversal of priorities in favour of the more useful and more lasting forms of communication.« Garland claims for a ”society that will tire of gimmick merchants, status salesman and hidden persuaders”.

After studying design at the Central School of Arts and Crafts in London in the early 1950s, Ken became for six years art editor of Design magazine and official mouthpiece of the Council of Industrial Design. In 1962 he left to establish his own graphic design studio, Ken Garland & Associates. He has contributed many articles to design periodicals in the UK, US, Europe and Japan and has also held lectures at universities around the globe, always outspoken, in person and in print. Garland’s photographic work has been seen in numerous exhibitions and books.

Design and its responsibility in our society has been Ken’s topic for the last 50 years. At TYPO London he will share his ideas on where design‘s priorities are now. (Photo: Anna Carson)

Ken Garland's first work for CND: a double crown poster for the 1962 Easter March

 

Ken Garland's famous 'frist things first'-manifesto, written and proclaimed in December 1963 and published in January 1964.

 

1. Which work are you particularly proud of? Which work best represents your style or approach?

the work I am always most interested in at any one time is the one I have done most recently; in this case it is a photograph in my ongoing series, ‘looking closer’, which I took four weeks ago. it is called ‘cover of water valve in pavement, camden town, london’. enlarged to twice its original scale it becomes something quite new: a monster.

 

2. The theme of this year’s TYPO London is »Social«. Do you consider design to be a social discipline? Which design project do you consider to be particularly socially relevant?

yes, I do. the most socially relevant design project of recent years is a book I commissioned, co-designed,with anna carson, and published. it is called ‘playing out’ by ruth garland (my daughter), and consists of drawings she executed about 40 years ago, as a teenager.

 

3. A conference like TYPO London is in itself an obvious example for a social event: what are you especially looking forward to?

I have no expectations; only curiosity.

 

4. Required reading/watching: What are currently your favorite interesting/beautiful publications, exhibitions, books, movies and/or websites?

16 October 2012

Four (or so) Questions to … Simon Manchipp

 

manchipp-webSimon‘s SomeOne has been behind the recent Royal Opera House rebrand, the re-grouping of the National Maritime Museum (the largest in the world), the Royal Observatory (The Home of Time) and the Queen’s House (The birthplace of British architectural classicism), the rebrand of the progressive high speed european train company Eurostar, and the launch of Telefónica Digital’s ‘Tu | Me’ brand.

He is a member of the D&AD Executive, an external assessor at Central St. Martins School of Art & Design, London, has written a short course on Typography and is a widely awarded and published voice on design and progressive branding. He also called Al Pacino, ‘Cappucino’ to his face, but thats another story.

Being the Executive Creative Director and Co-Founder of SomeOne, the progressive London based and internationally operating design practice, Simon launches and relaunches brands worldwide. SomeOne is working on some of the biggest and most high profile design projects in the sector. From telecoms to hotels, management consultants to train companies.

Simon has been in the business of design for over 20 years. He loves design. His brother, father, mother and wife are all designers… his 4 year old son and 4 month old daughter are yet to decide …

How Simon creates places to be and meet and how he attracts clients to be with him, he will let us know in his presentation: »Branding, not Blanding«, October 19, 2012, 4:00 pm at Logan Hall.

 
1. Which work are you particularly proud of? Which work best represents your style or approach?

I’m proud of all the work we have created at SomeOne — We like to do more than a logo for organisations, products and services, and this approach has led us to create all sorts of things. From creating sculptures to spinning tops. I love the diversity of project at SomeOne. It keeps every week feeling fresh with challenges rather than repetition. Our new work to create a full BrandWorld for Tizen (an amazing new open source operating system for anything with a screen) — Is a good example of how we have enabled a brand to brand things without predictable badging…

 

2. The theme of this year’s TYPO London is »Social«. Do you consider design to be a social discipline? Which design project do you consider to be particularly socially relevant?

Design has always been socially driven. It is not ‘Art’ which can exist purely for itself — design sets out to improve things — so it is created to be used by people. Therefore it is inherently social in it’s intentions (even if it is elitist in it’s principles) —  I thought the London 2012 Olympic games were an amazing example of how intelligently commissioned creative thinking can help unite society an an enormous scale. (ok, and some amazing sport too) — the sceptics soon turned into advocates when they saw it all come together to connect the UK to the world.

 

3. A conference like TYPO London is in itself an obvious example for a social event: what are you especially looking forward to?

I’m rather looking forward to my speech being over. Then I can relax! — and meet some like-minded people. I love meeting new people and hearing about their ideas, approach and manifesto when it comes to design and creativity.

4. Required reading/watching: What are currently your favorite interesting/beautiful publications, exhibitions, books, movies and/or websites?

 


16 October 2012

GraphicDesign& TYPO London survey: Are you a socialiser?

As a social scientist, I’m interested in something you probably rarely think about – who are designers? All sorts, you might say. Like other creative industries, graphic design has a reputation for heterogeneity and inclusivity. It isn’t who you are that matters, but rather what you create.

Nikandre Kopcke speaking at the GraphicDesign& launch, Design Museum, London copyright Richard Hubert Smith

But does who you are influence what you create, and how you perceive your role as a designer? As a commercial industry, graphic design shapes public opinion on everything from politics to artificial sweeteners. In this sense, all graphic design is inherently social. But do some designers see their practice as bearing more of a social responsibility than others? If so, who and why?

The publishing house GraphicDesign& asked me to investigate this for TYPO London. On Friday and Saturday from 5-6 pm, I’ll be distributing a mini survey that aims to find out a bit about who you are, and how you perceive your role as a designer. The survey is anonymous and won’t take you more than five minutes to complete. Please come by and fill one in – the research will be more interesting and robust the more people participate! The findings will be posted on the GraphicDesign& news pages and the TYPO London blog in the days following the conference.

The TYPO London survey is a precursor to a much larger research project due to be published as a GraphicDesign& Social Science title next year. This will use gender as a starting point to examining who graphic designers are and how success is defined in the industry. GraphicDesign& is a pioneering publishing house dedicated to creating intelligent, vivid books that explore how graphic design connects with all other things and the value that it brings.

Please participate!

Drama Studio/Creativity Awards Lounge
19, 20 October
5–6pm

by Nikandre Kopcke, social scientist

16 October 2012

How to get your badge

The badge is your key to TYPO London, it makes sure that you can enter the conference at any time without waiting. You can pick up your badge at the registration desk in the foyer of the Institute of Education. All you need to bring is your registration confirmation. Conference times are from 10:00 to 21:00, but beware if you want to see the first talk on Friday, better be early. We open doors at 08:30 am. (Photo: Gerhard Kassner)

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