TYPO London Blog
Stay tuned

Category »Four or so Questions«

Page 1 of 212
24 October 2012

Help TYPO London shine brighter

For the second time we where overwhelmed by TYPO London last friday and saturday. Close to 900 attendants followed the speeches of more than thirty international speakers in an unique atmosphere of inspired curiosity.

Typo London 2012, "Social", photo by Gerhard Kassner

Please help us to further improve TYPO London by filling in our three-minute-questionare. All you need to do is to login at MyTYPO and fill in your answers, of course completely anonymously.  Let us now how you liked the venue, what got you there and whom you would like to talk at the next TYPO conference.

We thank you for your support by drawing a free TYPO ticket among all entries. Please follow this link to our survey … 

- -

photo by Gerhard Kassner

17 October 2012

Four (or so) Questions to … Béa Beste

beste-web

 How do we have to learn today? What do our children need in order to be well prepared for the future? Where is “I”, where is “We”? Béa Beste collected ideas and impressions of an educational expedition on three continents. Education is her vocation.

After studying business engineering and social and economic communication she joined SAT1 Television, moved on to Boston Consulting Group and subsequently established the bilingual schools of Phorms Education in Berlin in 2005. Béas concept focuses on learning in a community with global education in local schools where each individual respects the other.

After CEOing her school for six years, Béa embarked on an educational expedition to India, Australia, Indonesia, and the USA in 2011. Inspired by the diversity of educational methodologies on an international scale, she began to develop PlayDUcation, a system to combine the worlds of learning and playing.

Béa will lead us to where »business« and »social« overlap and grants an amazing insight into how our brain runs on fun.

 

1. Which work are you particularly proud of? Which work best represents your style or approach?

I’m a school founder, my biggest achievements is a chain of bilingual schools across Germany. My current new project is tollabox, we just went online! It’s a monthly box designed for families with children aged 4-8. It fosters the natural creativity and curiosity! It’s learning by play: playducation.

An example for the contents of a Tollabox © www.tollabox.de

 

2. The theme of this year’s TYPO London is »Social«. Do you consider design to be a social discipline? Which design project do you consider to be particularly socially relevant?

Design is a way of thinking, shaping the world and communicating. I’m highly impressed by the Design Thinking School of the Hasso Plattner Institute. I’m a great admirer of schools designed to revolutionize education – like the Sydney Centre for innovation in Learning, High Tech High, or the Vittra Schools in Sweden.

 

3. A conference like TYPO London is in itself an obvious example for a social event: what are you especially looking forward to?

Visual impressions. New ways to see. People. Ideas. The Unexpected.

 

4. Required reading/watching: What are currently your favorite interesting/beautiful publications, exhibitions, books, movies and/or websites?


17 October 2012

Four (or so) Questions to … Ken Garland

Since 1962 Ken Garland equipped the British movement for Nuclear Disarment with a visual message and he became a devoted adherent to the campaign, that never earned him a single penny. In 1963 he wrote and proclaimed the The First Things First manifesto »in favour of the more useful and more lasting forms of communication« and demanded »Reversal of priorities in favour of the more useful and more lasting forms of communication.« Garland claims for a ”society that will tire of gimmick merchants, status salesman and hidden persuaders”.

After studying design at the Central School of Arts and Crafts in London in the early 1950s, Ken became for six years art editor of Design magazine and official mouthpiece of the Council of Industrial Design. In 1962 he left to establish his own graphic design studio, Ken Garland & Associates. He has contributed many articles to design periodicals in the UK, US, Europe and Japan and has also held lectures at universities around the globe, always outspoken, in person and in print. Garland’s photographic work has been seen in numerous exhibitions and books.

Design and its responsibility in our society has been Ken’s topic for the last 50 years. At TYPO London he will share his ideas on where design‘s priorities are now. (Photo: Anna Carson)

Ken Garland's first work for CND: a double crown poster for the 1962 Easter March

 

Ken Garland's famous 'frist things first'-manifesto, written and proclaimed in December 1963 and published in January 1964.

 

1. Which work are you particularly proud of? Which work best represents your style or approach?

the work I am always most interested in at any one time is the one I have done most recently; in this case it is a photograph in my ongoing series, ‘looking closer’, which I took four weeks ago. it is called ‘cover of water valve in pavement, camden town, london’. enlarged to twice its original scale it becomes something quite new: a monster.

 

2. The theme of this year’s TYPO London is »Social«. Do you consider design to be a social discipline? Which design project do you consider to be particularly socially relevant?

yes, I do. the most socially relevant design project of recent years is a book I commissioned, co-designed,with anna carson, and published. it is called ‘playing out’ by ruth garland (my daughter), and consists of drawings she executed about 40 years ago, as a teenager.

 

3. A conference like TYPO London is in itself an obvious example for a social event: what are you especially looking forward to?

I have no expectations; only curiosity.

 

4. Required reading/watching: What are currently your favorite interesting/beautiful publications, exhibitions, books, movies and/or websites?

16 October 2012

Four (or so) Questions to … Simon Manchipp

 

manchipp-webSimon‘s SomeOne has been behind the recent Royal Opera House rebrand, the re-grouping of the National Maritime Museum (the largest in the world), the Royal Observatory (The Home of Time) and the Queen’s House (The birthplace of British architectural classicism), the rebrand of the progressive high speed european train company Eurostar, and the launch of Telefónica Digital’s ‘Tu | Me’ brand.

He is a member of the D&AD Executive, an external assessor at Central St. Martins School of Art & Design, London, has written a short course on Typography and is a widely awarded and published voice on design and progressive branding. He also called Al Pacino, ‘Cappucino’ to his face, but thats another story.

Being the Executive Creative Director and Co-Founder of SomeOne, the progressive London based and internationally operating design practice, Simon launches and relaunches brands worldwide. SomeOne is working on some of the biggest and most high profile design projects in the sector. From telecoms to hotels, management consultants to train companies.

Simon has been in the business of design for over 20 years. He loves design. His brother, father, mother and wife are all designers… his 4 year old son and 4 month old daughter are yet to decide …

How Simon creates places to be and meet and how he attracts clients to be with him, he will let us know in his presentation: »Branding, not Blanding«, October 19, 2012, 4:00 pm at Logan Hall.

 
1. Which work are you particularly proud of? Which work best represents your style or approach?

I’m proud of all the work we have created at SomeOne — We like to do more than a logo for organisations, products and services, and this approach has led us to create all sorts of things. From creating sculptures to spinning tops. I love the diversity of project at SomeOne. It keeps every week feeling fresh with challenges rather than repetition. Our new work to create a full BrandWorld for Tizen (an amazing new open source operating system for anything with a screen) — Is a good example of how we have enabled a brand to brand things without predictable badging…

 

2. The theme of this year’s TYPO London is »Social«. Do you consider design to be a social discipline? Which design project do you consider to be particularly socially relevant?

Design has always been socially driven. It is not ‘Art’ which can exist purely for itself — design sets out to improve things — so it is created to be used by people. Therefore it is inherently social in it’s intentions (even if it is elitist in it’s principles) —  I thought the London 2012 Olympic games were an amazing example of how intelligently commissioned creative thinking can help unite society an an enormous scale. (ok, and some amazing sport too) — the sceptics soon turned into advocates when they saw it all come together to connect the UK to the world.

 

3. A conference like TYPO London is in itself an obvious example for a social event: what are you especially looking forward to?

I’m rather looking forward to my speech being over. Then I can relax! — and meet some like-minded people. I love meeting new people and hearing about their ideas, approach and manifesto when it comes to design and creativity.

4. Required reading/watching: What are currently your favorite interesting/beautiful publications, exhibitions, books, movies and/or websites?

 


15 October 2012

Four (or so) Questions to … Lucienne Roberts

roberts-web
Lucienne Roberts entered the fray of design practice with a utopian zeal that has never left her. In both sans+baum and her current studio LucienneRoberts+ her intention is to make accessible, engaging graphic design with a socially aware agenda. Influenced as much by feminism as Swiss typography, she believes that ethical design is defined by its ability to increase quality of life alongside the messages it conveys, and places emphasis on clear thinking, visual simplicity and the application of craft skills. Projects include exhibition design for the Wellcome Collection, British Council and The Women’s Library; identities for the Petrie Museum, the David Miliband campaign and AVA Academia; and book design for the Design Museum, Triangle Arts Trust and Panos London.

Alongside studio-based work, Lucienne writes, lectures and publishes on her subject. A signatory of the First Things First 2000 manifesto, her books include The Designer and the Grid [Rotovision, 2002] and Good: An Introduction to Ethics in Graphic Design [AVA Academia, 2006]. Her latest book, Design Diaries: Creative Process in Graphic Design [Laurence King, 2010] was co-written with design educator and writer Rebecca Wright.

With Rebecca, Lucienne is co-founder of GraphicDesign&, a pioneering publishing house dedicated to creating intelligent, vivid books that explore how graphic design connects with all other things and the value that it brings.

For her presentation at TYPO London (October 19, 2012, 11:00 am in Jeffery Hall), Lucienne will be joined by Rebecca and the social scientist Nikandre Kopcke.

 

1. Which work are you particularly proud of? Which work best represents your style or approach?

Given the theme of this year’s TYPO London it’s apposite to show work that I am proud has made a difference ‘socially’. Here’s an old favourite, an annual review for Breakthrough Breast Cancer when I was their design consultant. At the time one in twelve women in the UK developed breast cancer so using this as a theme seemed obvious.

Twelve photographers were invited to work with us. Shown here are the contributions from Clare Park and Fleur Olby. Fleur’s is a heartrending shot taken in response to hearing about a woman who had frozen food for her family before she died.

This text spread is really indicative of my approach to typography. Ever since reading Jan Tschichold I’ve been interested in the relationship between abstract art and typographic layout. Here the graphic interventions are restrained – a combination of alignments and large blocks of colour guide the reader around the text.

The subject matter was a bit gory but I took real delight in working on the recent Wellcome Collection exhibition Brains: the Mind as Matter and making the material as accessible and engaging as possible. The show’s focus was not what brains do to us, but what we have done to brains in the name of medical intervention, scientific enquiry, cultural meaning and technological change. Slicing, cutting, collecting and classifying were our starting point. We wanted to ‘preserve’ the exhibition title and visited the Royal College of Surgeons to learn how specimens are made. Shown here is the entrance and our title graphic. Each letter is made of ‘slices’ of Perspex contained in an acrylic box filled with glycerin and water. The refractive index matches that of real specimens so at different angles each letter appeared in multiples.

 

The exhibition wall texts alluded to diagrams and labels, incorporating leader lines and typographic devices to code each exhibition section while long inventory lists of the material on display were positioned at the end of each wall.

 

I am in love with books so am pleased to have written several on graphic design related subjects and be co-founder of the publishing house GraphicDesign&. My favourite book as author is probably my first, The Designer and the Grid in which I indulged an ongoing obsession with abstraction, structure and systems both in terms of the book’s layout and its content.

Read more »

15 October 2012

Four (or so) Questions to … Marius Watz

marius-watz

Marius Watz is a Norwegian artist working with computer code as a creative material. His work is concerned with the synthesis of form as the product of generative processes, and is known for its hard-edged geometries and vivid colors. Watz has exhibited his work widely at venues like Victoria & Albert Museum (London), Todaysart (The Hague), ITAU Cultural (Sao Paulo), Museumsquartier (Vienna), and Galleri ROM (Oslo). He is a lecturer in Interaction Design at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design. Marius’ presentation »Co-discovering with Machines (Or: Algorithms, our Beautiful and Problematic Friends)« will be held on Friday, October 19, 2012 at 6:00 pm in Jeffery Hall.

 

1. Which work are you particularly proud of? Which work best represents your style or approach?

Pride is a fickle and occasionally dangerous vice, but as a creator you’re bound to suffer from it. Recently I’ve been doing a lot of lo-fi 3D printing using a Makerbot, which I’m excited about even if I don’t know exactly what these objects are yet. They are conceived as objects, but I also like them for their graphic qualities.

Photo © Marius Watz

 

Photo © Marius Watz

 

Photo © Marius Watz

 

2. The theme of this year’s TYPO London is »Social«. Do you consider design to be a social discipline? Which design project do you consider to be particularly socially relevant?

I believe that design is inherently social, whether it deals with issues of communication or providing solutions for human needs. No people, no design.

 

3. A conference like TYPO London is in itself an obvious example for a social event: what are you especially looking forward to?

Personally, I’m looking forward to being around designers and thinking about design processes for a change. I spent years participating in design culture before realizing I was not in fact a designer, but even though my art practice often has little to do with that body of knowledge I am still fascinated by principles of design.

 

4. Required reading/watching: What are currently your favorite interesting/beautiful publications, exhibitions, books, movies and/or websites?

 As a person who is deeply embedded in the fractured world of social media I have been reduced to a consumer of hyperlinks, typically delivered in chunks of 140 characters. I currently read a fair amount about architecture while maintaining a guilty habit of watching documentaries via online streaming. Last favorite exhibition: Maurizio Cattelan at the Guggenheim.

 

9 October 2012

Four (or so) Questions to … Anthony Burrill

Anthony Burrill

Anthony Burrill has gained a following in the design world for his innovative collaborations with friends and fellow artists, designers, print-makers and film-makers. Burrill works across a range of media, including posters, moving image and three-dimensional work. His persuasive, up-beat illustration and design has been commissioned by cultural, social and commercial clients around the world from New York, to London to Tokyo.

He combines an instinctive handling of colour and composition with a witty approach to words. He has worked on advertising campaigns and posters for clients such as The Economist, the British Library and London Underground. He regularly collaborates with musicians and animators to make films, music promos and animations, using his distinctive visual vocabulary and passion for fusing sound and image. His installations and 3-D work have been commissioned by Colette in Paris and The Design Museum in London among others. Printmaking is an important part of Burrill’s practice and he creates limited edition prints with slogans that have become mantras for the design community and beyond. One of theses slogans inspired the title for his talk, which will take place at TYPO London 2012 on October 19, 2012, 12:00 pm in Logan Hall: »Working Hard and Being Nice to People« .

 

1. Which work are you particularly proud of? Which work best represents your style or approach?

In 2010 I collaborated with Happiness Brussels to print a poster using oil spilled in the Gulf of Mexico. The poster reads ‘OIL & WATER DO NOT MIX’ – a simple statement. When you consider the way the poster was produced, it gives a deeper meaning and resonance. The poster became popular, people responded to the idea positively, the way it was produced and what it said. It’s the simplest ideas that have most effect. The idea and execution were strongly linked with each other. The poster makes a comment in a clever and engaging way, this is something that I try to do with all my work.

Poster "Oil & Water do not mix" © A. Burrill

 

Poster "Oil & Water do not mix" © A. Burrill

 

2. The theme of this year’s TYPO London is »Social«. Do you consider design to be a social discipline? Which design project do you consider to be particularly socially relevant?

Design is an incredibly social discipline, it is about communication between human beings. My work wouldn’t exist without the network of friends and collaborators I am part of. I think the ‘WORK HARD & BE NICE TO PEOPLE’ poster is a social project. It has gained widespread recognition and popularity, escaping the ‘design’ world and becoming known not because it is a piece of graphic design, but as a piece of communication. The message resonates with a wide range of people, it is a positive message, simply communicated.

Poster 'WORK HARD & BE NICE TO PEOPLE' © A.Burrill

 

3. A conference like TYPO London is in itself an obvious example for a social event: what are you especially looking forward to?

I’m looking forward to hearing my contemporaries speaking about their work and experiences. Everybody has a fascinating story and their own approach and it’s always fascinating to see how people have developed their work and the way in which it engages with a broader society.

 

4. Required reading/watching: What are currently your favorite interesting/beautiful publications, exhibitions, books, movies and/or websites?

My favourite thing to do is walking in the countryside where I live, my family and I have recently moved to a new house and I’m gain inspiration from the surrounding countryside. As for exhibitions, I recently saw new work by Antony Gormley at White Cube in London. The new pieces are sculptures of simple human forms constructed out of numerous small metal boxes, almost like one of his regular pieces bitmapped at 72 dpi. The atmosphere in the gallery was calm, meditative and very inspiring. I’m currently reading ‘Publikation’, a biography of the band Kraftwerk by David Buckley, the book is exhaustive in its research, I’m a big fan of Kraftwerk, so it’s a real treat!

8 October 2012

Four (or so) Questions to … Kirsty Carter & Emma Thomas

APFEL-web

Entering a visual dialogue with the spectator: the works of London-based A Practice for Everyday Life draw international attention. Recent projects include the exhibition design and publication of “Bauhaus: Art as Life“ at Barbican Art Gallery and a new visual identity for Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam. Working on everything from brand identity, print to signage, wayfinding and exhibition design, Kirsty Carter and Emma Thomas enjoy investigating, exploring, collecting and experimenting to arrive at outcomes that surprise, delight and engage on many levels.

Currently they are working on the graphic identity of a new cross-disciplinary arts space in Hong Kong and the design of a major new retrospective publication for artist Linder. At  the TYPO London Kirsty and Emma will show us how their communication skills create settings that one feels inescapably drawn into. (Photo: Carol Sachs)

1. Which work are you particularly proud of? Which work best represents your style or approach?

As well as our work for The Hepworth Wakefield, Postmodernism and Tristram Shandy, which were featured in an earlier TYPO blog post here, there are a handful of other projects that we think represent us as an agency very well. In no particular order…

Title: Bauhaus: Art As Life
Project: Exhibition Design, Catalogue & Marketing Materials
Client: Barbican

Bauhaus: Art as Life at Barbican Art Gallery was the largest exhibition of Bauhaus work to be held in the UK for almost 40 years. Alongside architects Carmody Groarke, we were challenged to work within the Barbican Art Gallery’s complex layout to create an installation and graphic scheme that would lead visitors through an exhibition narrative encompassing over 400 Bauhaus works. Our design aimed to contextualise the content of the exhibition whilst avoiding pastiche. Graphically, it was informed by an awareness of the Bauhaus’ own principles of colour, structure and typography – painted walls, bold panels and supergraphics draw together objects, themes and ideas, and the typeface used throughout is a contemporary revival of the letterpress typeface used within the Bauhaus itself, Breite Grotesk.

Bauhaus exhibition at Barbican book cover © APFEL

 

Bauhaus exhibition at Barbican © APFEL

 

Bauhaus exhibition at Barbican marketing material © APFEL

 

Bauhaus exhibition at Barbican © APFEL

 

Title: The Art and Craft of Richard Woods
Project: Book Design
Client: Lund Humphries

This book showcases the work of Richard Woods, an artist and designer who practices at the convergence of a variety of disciplines ranging from architecture to furniture design—it’s a scrapbook of his works, ideas and production processes. We worked closely with Woods for the book and, after extensive dialogue and several visits to his studio, decided on a format that emphasised the strong visual character and impact of his work, with graphic interventions kept to a minimum. Photographs and installation shots are presented full-bleed, interspersed with sketches, working notes and facsimiles of press releases, email exchanges and magazine articles. Divider pages cut through the book as the only intervention amidst the assortment of collected ephemera, and on the cover, the title is silkscreened over an image from one of Woods’ works.

Richard Woods book – Lund Humphries © APFEL

 

Richard Woods book – Lund Humphries © APFEL

 

Richard Woods book – Lund Humphries © APFEL

 

Title: Design Research Unit 1942–72
Project: Book Design
Client: Koenig Books / Cubitt Gallery

Design Research Unit was formed in 1943 as the first ‘full service’ design consultancy in the UK, bringing together expertise in architecture, graphics and industrial design. Based on original research, this retrospective publication was produced to accompany last year’s touring exhibition about the DRU, curated by Michelle Cotton.

This project was a graphic designer’s dream to work on. Its design took its cues from a broad range of DRU materials including early studio documents, advertisements and commonly-used typefaces. The book is set mostly in Monotype Grotesque, which was used widely in their studio work, and Futura Schlagzeile is used on the cover and throughout as the headline typeface, echoing an early advertisement for DRU predecessor the Industrial Design Partnership. The cover displays a quote taken from a leaflet (c.1943) that Design Research Unit supplied to prospective clients, along with artists and designers, outlining what the agency stood for and how their design process worked.

Design Research Unit – Koenig Books / Cubitt Gallery © APFEL

 

Design Research Unit – Koenig Books / Cubitt Gallery © APFEL

 

Design Research Unit – Koenig Books / Cubitt Gallery © APFEL

 

 

Read more »

4 October 2012

Four (or so) Questions to … Matthew Butterick

Matthew Butterick is a writer, dig­i­tal type designer and attor­ney in Los Ange­les. At TYPO London, he will be speaking about “Rebuilding the Typographic Society” .

 

1. Which work are you particularly proud of? Which work best represents your style or approach?

At any given time, the project I like best is the one I’ve most recently completed; the project I like least is the one I’m currently wrestling with. So while I curse at the programming that’s been necessary to pull off my next font, I’ve been able to better enjoy my last font, Equity. In particular, I’ve been doing more writing with it.

 

Matthew Butterick’s Equity font

 

 

Matthew Butterick’s Berlin Sans font

 

2. The theme of this year’s TYPO London is »Social«. Do you consider design to be a social discipline? Which design project do you consider to be particularly socially relevant?

At TYPO Berlin, I talked about the idea that the highest form of design is when designers invest their humanity in the objects they make. That sense of humanity, in turn, gets transmitted to users of those objects. But by characterizing design as a distinctively human communication, I’m also saying that design is a social act. So in my talk at TYPO London, I’ll be investigating that idea further.

Matthew Butterick on stage at TYPO Berlin © G. Kassner

Intersecting this idea is the broader historical fact that the printed word is one of the most socially vital inventions of the last thousand years. For those of us involved with type design and typography, I think it’s important to keep at least one finger on that golden thread and its possibilities. But that resolve is tested in any era when printing costs drop rapidly, for instance the last 20 years, during which the Internet has taken printing costs nearly to zero. If designers don’t rise to the occasion, who will?

 

3. A conference like TYPO London is in itself an obvious example for a social event: what are you especially looking forward to?

As a speaker, TYPO is an event that I wish I could attend a second time purely as an audience member. The TYPO talks are always a great cross-pollination of design thinking with all kinds of other thinking. As designers, we all need to be occasionally reminded how large the domain of design can be.

 

4. Required reading/watching: What are currently your favorite interesting/beautiful publications, exhibitions, books, movies and/or websites?

I found Joost Grootens’s recent book »I swear I use no art at all« to be completely absorbing. I’m also a huge fan of New York magazine, which I consider the best-written and best-designed American magazine.

 

 

1 October 2012

Four (or so) Questions to … Eike König

HORT is a Berlin based graphic design studio made up of uniquely selected, creative and spirited people. Throughout its existence Hort has been a constant pioneer in re-inventing the visual language of contemporary graphic design. HORTʼs ongoing experimental enthusiasm inspires budding young designers and has become an influential source amongst contemporaries.

When away from his Humble HORT Hub, founder Eike König takes on the role of mentor. He is currently the Professor of Graphic Design and Illustration at the HfG University of Arts, Offenbach, Germany. He conducts numerous creative workshops and lectures internationally. His knowledge and experience have taken him as far as South America and Australia, sharing his stories with different audiences at acclaimed design conferences. Lead Academy recognised HORT’s hard work, awarding the studio Germany’s Visual Leader of the year 2011. Here are Eike’s answers, from HORT to HEART, as he would say!

1. Which work are you particularly proud of? Which work best represents your style or approach?

Each work I have done so far is somehow important and to name one wouldn’t be right. On each job there’s something you can learn. I’m proud of how I run my studio. I am proud of the people I work with. This makes me more happy and fulfilled than money or success.

 

2. The theme of this year’s TYPO London is »Social«. Do you consider design to be a social discipline? Which design project do you consider to be particularly socially relevant?

I think everything you do (besides dreaming and things that are just related to you and no one else) has some kind of social impact and is therefore relevant – more or less. I prefer micro social awareness – whatever you do will come back to you. So: Yes, design is a social discipline because it is a way of communication – a very strong one.

 

3. A conference like TYPO London is in itself an obvious example for a social event: what are you especially looking forward to?

To be honest, what I really love is to meet people. This is a good chance to talk to people I know already and to those I will meet for the first time. It’s good to build connections and to find out if there are intersections (not sure if this is the right word – crossovers?). Over the last years I have spoken at many conferences and sometimes you find a crossover, and then come back home having made a new friend. It couldn’t be better. Also it’s nice to listen to other people’s stories. You can learn a lot from their experience, even if their passions are different from your own.

 

4. Required reading/watching: What are currently your favorite interesting/beautiful publications, exhibitions, books, movies and/or websites?

 

Page 1 of 212




Created by: