Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Deanna Paquette, Philippe Intraligi: The power of in-house design teams

18. Mai 2014

All the way from Brooklyn, Deanna Paquette, Digital Director, and Philippe Intraligi, Creative Director at Shutterstock, shared insights about working as in-house designers in such a big organisation.

Deanna Paquette, Philippe Intraligi: The power of in-house design teams

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

All the way from Brooklyn, Deanna Paquette, Digital Director, and Philippe Intraligi, Creative Director at Shutterstock, shared insights about working as in-house designers in such a big organisation.
Their talk revolved around 3 pillars, “know your people”, “know your assets”, “know your community” during which they illustrated how creativity can actually fit in an industry that is perceived as boring and non-challenging.

1. Know your people
One advantage of working as an in-house professional is having quick and easy access to the whole organisation, as everyone is working in the same physical space and an answer is just one question to the desk across the room away. In such a close collaboration environment, the designers are enabled to beta test their products and provide direct feedback to the developers.

2. Know your assets
My personal favourite part of the talk, as many interesting side projects were presented along with background story on how and why they created them. One of them was Spectrum, a tool to search for images based on their overall colour feel, while in Offset, photographs are curated by award-winning photographers and offered to the public with simplified pricing and licensing with global usage rights.
After that there was time for some video action as we got to see one of their latest 20” advertisements featuring animals and a beatboxing music soundtrack (who doesn’t love this combination?). Next in the movie reel was a moving clip featuring stories from Shutterstock contributors from around the world, in a competition to vote for the best.
Other things that they shared were the annual design trends infographic, an arguably creative and useful way to use the countless search data they receive through their platform. Collaborations with third parties were not uncommon, as they provided free images for the Creative Mornings presentations in Metahaus, Berlin.
The last showcase was their blog, an until then neglected asset, which was given the needed love with a redesign and a content refresh, making it grow so large that it now features 5 copywriters in different languages in the world.

3. Know your community
One danger working in this industry is to get easily bored by doing the same things, so cultivating culture by either staying up to date with the world’s latest news or holding events within the community are crucial parts of staying creatively fresh.
Morning talks, like those attended by the famous Swissmiss or weekly get-togethers within design teams are useful events to bring people together. Hackathons, also, provide a nice platform for creating interesting projects — I’m curious, though, to learn which was the project to beat the Google Glass implementation of design tutorials in their latest hackathon.
Finally, Pixels of Fury, an event that was also held later in the same night in Berlin, seemed very interesting: 6 designers competing against each other to design something in 20 minutes in front of an audience with DJs and drinks.
Something like ADC awards, but for college.

Text: Spiros Martzoukos

photo © Sebastian Weiß

Vitaly Friedman: Real-life responsive web design

18. Mai 2014

In one of the most entertaining talks of the Thursday evening, Vitaly Friedman, the colourful personality behind Smashing Magazine, gave a talk about club entrance rejection stories, ASCII art, teletext, scrum process and web performance. Oh, and he threw orange fluffy balls to the audience. Orange fluffy balls are always an indicator of a good talk.

Vitaly Friedman: Real-life responsive web design

photo © Sebastian Weiß

In one of the most entertaining talks of the Thursday evening, Vitaly Friedman, the colourful personality behind Smashing Magazine, gave a talk about club entrance rejection stories, ASCII art, teletext, scrum process and web performance. Oh, and he threw orange fluffy balls to the audience. Orange fluffy balls are always an indicator of a good talk.

As the context of the conference was about typography, there was no better way to start a presentation about the digital and typography intersection than showing pieces of ASCII art with examples from so early as the 40s. Decades later, the experience from these illustrations would transfer to the TV screen with BBC’s introduction of teletext, a digital TV guide compiled of ASCII art on steroids. A question directed to the audience “who designed these complex pages?” drew a smile on their faces, as they empathised with these early heroes for the amount of labour they put, but also started to realise the underlying metaphor of switching medium contexts, from print to screen.

A transition with a lot of open challenges, the biggest of which is dealing with the vast array of available screen sizes. “We need a responsive system for that” said Vitaly and quickly jumped into listing available methods of building this system. Brad Frosts’s ever-present Atomic Design methodology, living style guide tools and the modern front end developer’s mantra “create a tiny bootstrap for every project” marched through the big projection.

Of course, these are tools and as with every craft, tools on their own mean nothing if they’re not deployed in the appropriate process. So, as with many other talks in TYPO, the Scrum methodology principles of putting interdisciplinary teams working together on an incremental part of the project, made their appearance in these slides too. A slide of a typical waterfall process of a designer handing designs to a front end developer, handing work to a back end developer, handing work to an editor, accompanied by the rhetorical question “where does responsive design fit in all this?” illustrated the point that the process of creating a digital product requires involvement of more than one principles at the same time.

A little more technical slides followed, like creating smarter urls and taking care of performance issues in mobile, before my and, possibly most of the audience’s favourite part came. In this, to emphasise the importance of performance tweaking, Vitaly made an experiment of how much it would cost him to download an assets-heavy website, in a foreign country, using a mobile carrier’s roaming charges. A (maybe not) surprising example of vogue.co.uk leading to a 93€ charge in megabytes and data fees raised some laughs, but also concerns from a lot of the front end developers among the crowd.

As with every self respected responsive presentation, the Guardian website was referenced as a great example of a mobile-first website (it is!), from their stealth mobile relaunch strategy to lazy loading their assets to give priority to content. Some impressive performance benchmarks followed, but despite the talker’s double attempts to draw the needed awe sounds from the crowd most of them stared at the stacked books in front of him, probably wondering if they would be thrown upon them too.

As the long talk was way overdue, the closing slide picturing the Voyager Golden Record was a bit rushed through, however the metaphor of creating performant, sustainable websites that would last five or ten years (which equal to an eternity in web years) was clear, understandable and to the point.

Text: Spiros Martzoukos

photo © Sebastian Weiß

photo © Sebastian Weiß

TypeCookers: Sketching Session

18. Mai 2014

Typecooks van Blokland and van der Laan fried and roasted the recipes sketched by TYPO guests during the conference.

TypeCookers: Sketching Session

photo © Sebastian Weiß

Typecooks Erik van Blokland and Paul van der Laan fried and roasted the recipes sketched by TYPO guests during the conference.

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Andreas Frohloff: Cancellaresca – Wurzel unserer Schreibschrift

18. Mai 2014

Seit Jahren der Renner unter den TYPO-Workshops: die Kalligrafie-Workshops mit Andreas Fronoff, dem Leiter des Type Department bei FontShop International. Diesmal: Einführung in das Schreiben einer Breitfeder-Kursiv nach den Schreibmusterblättern von Axel Bertram.

Andreas Frohloff: Cancellaresca – Wurzel unserer Schreibschrift

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Seit Jahren der Renner unter den TYPO-Workshops: die Kalligrafie-Workshops mit Andreas Frohloff, dem Leiter des Type Department bei FontShop International. Diesmal: Einführung in das Schreiben einer Breitfeder-Kursiv nach den Schreibmusterblättern von Axel Bertram.

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

LANGESOMMER: Hebräische Kalligrafie

18. Mai 2014

Das hebräische Alef-bet ist das Alphabet des antiken und modernen Hebräisch und eines der ältesten noch verwendeten. In Zusammenarbeit mit dem Jüdischen Museum Berlin gab der Workshop von LANGESOMMER Einblicke in die hebräische Kalligrafie und Schrift.

LANGESOMMER: Hebräische Kalligrafie

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Das hebräische Alef-bet ist das Alphabet des antiken und modernen Hebräisch und eines der ältesten noch verwendeten. In Zusammenarbeit mit dem Jüdischen Museum Berlin gab der Workshop von LANGESOMMER Einblicke in die hebräische Kalligrafie und Schrift. Gemeinsam mit Amichai Green vom Jüdischen Museum, lernten die TeilnehmerInnen, hebräische Buchstaben mit einer Feder zu schreiben und damit Duktus und Schönheit der hebräischen Kalligrafie kennenzulernen.

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Boris Brumnjak: (Typografische) Schwarz-Weiß-Plakate

18. Mai 2014

Boris Brumnjak sammelt seit 15 Jahren leidenschaftlich gerne Schwarz-weiss-Plakate – hat er sich in eines verliebt, tut er alles dafür um es in seine Sammlung aufzunehmen.

Boris Brumnjak: (Typografische) Schwarz-Weiß-Plakate

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Boris Brumnjak sammelt seit 15 Jahren leidenschaftlich gerne Schwarz-weiss-Plakate – hat er sich in eines verliebt, tut er alles dafür um es in seine Sammlung aufzunehmen. Das ist nicht immer leicht, erst einmal muss er den Gestalter ausfindig machen oder jemanden finden, der das Plakat besitzt. Für seine Sammlung nimmt er nur Plakate auf, die ihm zu 100% gefallen – ein Jein gibt es nicht. 1/3 seiner Arbeit ist die Recherche der Plakate, wobei der Zufall eine große Rolle spielt. Ob im Alltag, auf Ausstellungsbesuchen, an Flughäfen – das nächste Objekt seiner Begierde könnte hinter jeder Ecke lauern. Im nächsten Schritt erhält der Gestalter oder Besitzer des Plakates einen persönlichen handschriftlich geschribenen Brief mit einer selbstangefertigten Skizze des Plakats.

Bekommt er auf diese Anfrage eine Antwort, macht er sich auf die Reise, denn er scheut keine Kilometer, um den Gestalter auch persönlich kennenzulernen. Denn so erfährt er Dinge, die man nicht in Büchern nachlesen kann. Eines seiner schönsten Erlebnisse sei der Besuch bei Hans Rudolf Bosshard gewesen, der ihn in seine Bibliothek einlud.

Seine Sammlung wurde bereits in Luzern ausgestellt. Dazu hat er einen doch sehr ungwöhnlichen Ausstellungskatalog gestaltet – die Plakate sind nicht fotografisch abgelichtet worden sondern von ihm per Hand nachskizziert.

Christiana Teufel, slanted

Photo: © Gerhard Kassner

Fraser Muggeridge: New Rave Typography

18. Mai 2014

The first thing we see when designer and type experimentalist Fraser Muggeridge enters the stage is not himself, but his flashing yellow trousers he wears. It’s stated clear: This is going to be raavvvy!

Fraser Muggeridge: New Rave Typography

 

Photo: © Gerhard Kassner

The first thing we see when designer and type experimentalist Fraser Muggeridge enters the stage is not himself, but his flashing yellow trousers he wears. It’s stated clear: This is going to be raavvvy!

Move from Regular to Bold, not from Regular to Medium!

“Almost Boring” is the way Fraser Muggenridge describes his early work. Almost boring, that means: Very consistent, very formal, very clean—with only a minor detail that the whole typography relies on to be interesting.

“Almost boring“ Also means: Don’t go crazy. Fraser shows a couple of posters he designed and printed with a Letraset: It’s not the arrangement or variety of fonts used that make the layout interesting, but the imperfection of the printing itself.

Text As Image As Text: Letters are sculptures!

Over the years, this imperfection has become one of Fraser’s bigger passions. His experiments with typography, distortion and letter-bending ended up in a process of image-making: Strong concepts are accompanied by almost sculptured typography. It was not about designing letters anymore, but creating them through mistakes, algorithms and conceptual distortion. Making symbols, strange juxtapositions; moving on and away from Nearly Boring was what it was all about.

If we take a look at the aesthetics of the New Rave movement in pop culture—psychedelic visuals, neon colours, flashing lights and an anarchic energy—we are pretty close to Fraser’s recent projects. With his project “Mega Font”, he experimented with subtle typographic errors: Mixing letters from Times New Roman with Bookman, aligning a typeface by it’s x-height, generating a slight wonkiness which generally is invisible, but hurts the typographer’s eye: This is New Rave. “It’s all about the subtlety”, as Fraser sums it up. “Sometimes, fonts are just too perfect.”

That space before the comma is intentional!

His personal development is best described as “being really mono to being really lairy”. The mistakes you can find in Fraser’s designs all of sudden become incredibly charming, once you realized that breaking rules is fun: “New Rave means everything is possible. You are allowed to do whatever you want to do—It is very expressive.” The first slide he showed us in the beginning; a very tidy, very tame layout of a book page he created a couple of years ago, now compared to his more recent work: “Sooo ravvvy”.

See Fraser Muggeridge’s recent projects at pleasedonotbend.co.uk.

Text: Christoph Rauscher
@christowski

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Gerrit Noordzij

17. Mai 2014

Gerrit Noordzij – legendärer Typograf, Schriftgestalter, Lehrer und Autor. Wer kennt seinen Namen nicht in der Typografie-Welt?

Gerrit Noordzij

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Gerrit Noordzij – legendärer Typograf, Schriftgestalter, Lehrer und Autor. Wer kennt seinen Namen nicht in der Typografie-Welt? Zwischen 1960er bis 1990er Jahren lehrte er an der königlichen Akademie von der bildenden Künste in Den Haag. Sein Buch “»The Stroke« ist weltbekannt und immer noch beliebt. Seine Theorie der Schrift ist die Wurzel der heutigen Typografie.

Aus gesundheitlichen Gründen wurde hierfür ein Video-Inteview bei ihm aufgenommen und auf der TYPO gezeigt. Seine Antworten waren teilweise kritisch, ironisch und provokativ. Nach Video folgte eine Diskussion mit ehemaligen Studenten (Erik und Petr van Bockland, Albert-Jan Pool). Das Video wird bald mit dem englischen Untertitel veröffentlich – unbedingt anschauen!

かの欧文タイポグラフィー界の伝説的タイポグラファー・書体デザイナー・教授・著作家,ゲリット・ノールツァイ(Gerrit Noordzij).現在のタイポグラファーで彼の名を知らないものがいるのだろうか.現在のタイポグラフィー界で彼の影響下にないものなどあり得ない.デンハーグの王立アカデミータイプアンドメディアで1960年代から1990年代まで教えていた彼の理論は,今日世界中に散らばる有名なタイポグラファーたちのRootsであるといっても過言ではない.今回のタイポベルリンのテーマRootsという言葉がよく当てはまる人選である.
しかしそんな彼もかなりの歳のため,体の調子には勝てず,今回はビデオ撮影での参加となった。さすがにかつてのようにはいかず,ビデオの中でインタビューに答える姿はあまり明快・快調な口調ではないものの,あの伝説上の人物が直接しゃべる機会を見に多くの観客がビデオを見守った.
彼は自分の考えを説明するのに欧文書体の特徴,葦のペン先形状のもので文字を書く例を挙げ書かれた文字と描かれた文字の違いや,フェニキアを介してギリシャへ伝わったアルファベットの歴史を挙げ彼の理論を説明する.しかしながら,彼の説明することは時に難しく説明も概念的で,且つ口調もわかりづらい感じを受けた.話はさらに手書き文字から印刷文字へとつながりデジタルフォントにまで及ぶ.そして今日世界中で活躍する彼の教え子たちについてまで質問は及んだ.ときに批判的であり,攻撃的ですらある彼の意見は,皮肉とも挑発ともとれる.その物事を見る姿勢こそが彼の仕事をここまで高めた原動力でありRootsであるとも言えるかもしれない.インタビューでは,終始笑顔と真面目な顔を織り交ぜ,厳しい意見を言いながらもとても暖かみのある人物像が見受けられた.

ビデオ講演の後にはユルゲン・ジーベルト(Jürgen Siebert) の司会進行でノールツァイの元生徒であるアルバート・ジャン・プール(Albert-Jan Pool),ペトル・ファン・ブロックランド(Petr van Blokland) エリック・ファン・ブロックランド(Erik van Blokland)らを中心に当時を振り返る.彼らの一致した意見として,当時あまり何を言っているか理解してなかったという意見にまとまったが,正しくこの講演ビデオを見終わったあとの感想にふさわしい意見であった.

年齢的にも公の場に姿を現す機会がもうあまりない彼の講演は,とても貴重でありこの映像を見ることができとても感激したが,今後この講演ビデオに英語字幕をつけ公開する予定だそうなので,公開された際にはぜひ今回会場に来れなかった方々も鑑賞してほしい.

Text: Toshiya Izumo

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

 

CA-iPad1

Computer Arts: Special TYPO offer

17. Mai 2014

We hope you have all been following the TYPO Berlin coverage by Computer Arts. As our media partners, they where so kind to offer TYPO attendees the chance to try Computer Arts’ award-winning iPad edition for free.

Computer Arts: Special TYPO offer

We hope you have all been following the TYPO Berlin coverage by Computer Arts. As our media partners, they where so kind to offer TYPO attendees the chance to try Computer Arts’ award-winning iPad edition for free.

Computer Arts is the magazine for people who believe design matters, and has been inspiring and informing graphic designers and illustrators since 1995.

With both a deluxe print edition and a fully-interactive, bespoke iPad edition, CA brings you behind-the-scenes access to cutting-edge design projects, in-depth analysis and incisive opinions from the design world’s thought leaders, plus the very best new work from the global design community.

And TYPO Berlin attendees can download a FREE copy of its award-winning iPad edition, until 24th May. To claim your free issue, simply:

  • Download Computer Arts app
  • Open the app on your iPad
  • Tap the ‘Voucher’ button
  • Enter voucher code TYPO14
  • Enjoy your free issue!

T&Cs: Voucher valid until 24/5/14. Voucher redeemable in respect of iPad/iPhone apps available on the App Store only. Use subject to our Terms and Conditions for in-app voucher codes. Offer is non-transferable. Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer. No cash value.

Foto © Gerhard Kassner

Grzegorz Laszuk and the Raiders of the Lost Things

17. Mai 2014

First Things. Last Things. Fuck Things – Ein kleines Interludium über Signal und Wirkung. CAN LETTERS CHANGE THE WORLD? // LETTERS CREATE THE SHAPE OF WORDS. // WORDS TELL US ABOUT IDEAS. // IDEAS ARE THE MIRROR OF DREAMS. // DREAMS CAN CHANGE THE WORLD. //

Grzegorz Laszuk and the Raiders of the Lost Things

Foto © Gerhard Kassner

First Things. Last Things. Fuck Things – Ein kleines Interludium über Signal und Wirkung.

Sie sind gelandet, jetzt sind sie da. In mehr und weniger eng anliegenden silberfarbenen Anzügen. Es geht um Aliens und was sie in der Zukunft gefunden haben werden. Zeichen werden gefunden sein, Signale. Es gibt außerdem eine Nebelmaschine in allem was auf uns zukommt.

DO YOU COPY? WHAT DO YOU SEE? EMPTINESS.

Emptiness übersetzt sich mit Leere und Inhaltslosigkeit. „Emptiness as a human condition is a sense of generalized boredom,social alienation and apathy.“ (sagt Wikipedia dazu)
Also, es wird sich so zugetragen haben werden: Aliens landen auf der Erde. Die Erde ist dann leer. Und das einzige das sie gefunden haben werden, ist das Manifest „First things First“ von Ken Garland. Der wiederum hat letztes Jahr die TYPO eröffnet und hatte vor fünfzig Jahren die großartige Idee, sich als Designer nicht der Werbung zu verpflichten, sondern gesellschaftlicher relevanteren Dingen. Deshalb ist er auch der MASTER in der Videoprojektion auf der Bühne. Deshalb liest nicht nur er aus seinem Manifest, nein, es wird auch noch sehr operesque synchrongesungen.
Warum das alles? Weil es sich hier um eine Preview handelt, für die eigentliche Premiere des Stücks „First Things, Last Things“ von Grzegorz Laszuk and the Raiders of the Lost Things. In Warschau. Im November. Das sollen wir uns merken.
Und warum noch? Weil es sich vielleicht auch um die ein oder andere Ebene von Relevanz gehandelt haben könnte. Morgens um elf auf einer internationalen Design-Konferenz.
Die Frage steht, klingt und bleibt:

CAN LETTERS CHANGE THE WORLD?
LETTERS CREATE THE SHAPE OF WORDS.
WORDS TELL US ABOUT IDEAS.
IDEAS ARE THE MIRROR OF DREAMS.
DREAMS CAN CHANGE THE WORLD.

CAN LETTERS CHANGE THE WORLD?

Das könnte man verstanden haben werden. Für alle anderen gibt es am Ende sehr viel Glitzer und in der Reihe hinter mir folgende Unterhaltung…
Boy: You hated it, right?
Girl: I don’t know. I’m mostly interested in the comments on it.
Boy: Well, I don’t know what this was all about but I thought it looked really cool.

Nachdenkend, über die innere und äußere Leere, die sich breit gemacht haben wird, während und nach uns, kann der Saal verlassen werden. Kann es weitergehen im Programm.

Text: Ivana Rohr