photo © Sebastian Weiß

Joost Grootens: More matter with less art

19. Mai 2014

A man spending his life dedicated to clarifying information, Dutch book designer, Joost Grootens, began with letting the TYPO audience know that there are women designers in The Netherlands and ones under age 43. With the air cleared, he began leading us into a 45 minute lecture on how to visually capture the essence of the information you aim to convey.

Joost Grootens: More matter with less art

photo © Sebastian Weiß

A man spending his life dedicated to clarifying information, Dutch book designer, Joost Grootens, began with letting the TYPO audience know that there are women designers in The Netherlands and ones under age 43. With the air cleared, he began leading us into a 45 minute lecture on how to visually capture the essence of the information you aim to convey.

He began with leading us into the roots of why he designs for architecture. Despite, once designing a door handle with braille on it, he’s never quite been an architect. And despite hating working with architects because “they are also designers,” Grootens’ studio produces the majority of its work for architectural academic and research books.

Not being an architect beneficially allows Grootens to present this information about architecture in new and interesting ways, that reflect the nature of the buildings in book form.

“I find it very inspirational to think about the representation of architecture, since architecture itself is a representation of a dream,” Grootens said.

He gave three very different examples of books style mirroring the styles of architectural firms. For a book on Japanese architecture firm SAANA, Grootens utilized double imagery and very little text to represent the non-hierarchy in the buildings and to “capture the essence of SAANA’s style.” Conversely, he highlighted a book on Peter Zumthor with a tactile cover and “filmic sequence” layout which visually complemented the “I” statements in the text. Finally, he shared a book for MDRV integrating a social aspect of the buildings with photos from users and social media as well as professionals.

After sharing his foundation in architecture, Grootens talked more about his fascination with atlases and indexes as an ideal visual format, using the palette of means to convey information (from maps to photos to data). In a fast-paced technological society, it’s critical to “take information out of the flux and study it,” he said.

Grootens then walked the audience through the 26 month journey to create a collections book for Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam. Indexing an art collection was a mix of database management and hand-tweaking. The possibilities for conveying information were endless, from chronological by creation date to collection date, to maps by artist origin. “It’s all about the thinking and rethinking of what you can do with information,” he emphasized.

Finally, Grootens left us with a teaser of his new typeface for indexing – Ceremony – coming out in June 2014. Developed for numbers initially, the typeface encompasses an array of alphanumeric glyphs as well as symbols. News on it can be found at Optimo.ch.

Text: Meghan Arnold

photo © Sebastian Weiß

 

photo © Sebastian Weiß

Tomas Mrazauskas: Is it possible to invent the book today?

19. Mai 2014

Introduced by Jürgen Siebert as a “book philosopher,” Tomas Mrazaukas imparted his thoughts on books in a post-industrial society to the TYPO audience on Friday.

Tomas Mrazauskas: Is it possible to invent the book today?

photo © Sebastian Weiß

Introduced by Jürgen Siebert as a “book philosopher,” Tomas Mrazaukas imparted his thoughts on books in a post-industrial society to the TYPO audience on Friday.

Why do we look at books today with “rules” assigned to them? Mrazaukas surmises that because books came up during the industrial revolution we assign them industrial standards. However, now that “we see post-industrial spaces being transformed into something useless in industrial terms, into creative spaces,” perhaps we should think about the book that way as well. For example, the Highline in New York is a public, creative space, of which you can’t measure the value. Just like these spaces, books should be an experience for people.

He mentioned that socially he now introduces himself with a book. Instead of explaining that he’s a “self-taught book designer” he asks “Can I show you something? And then the magic starts.”

This non-traditional approach, including design by non-designers and publishing by non-publishers, has led to success because “We [our team] was looking for new ways and we found them?”

He theorized that the cycle of technology from analog to digital technology isn’t really new, but the internet/digital information is just a continuation of the jump that happened from the industrialized (or institutionalized) Gutenberg process to the more democratic Linotype printing which evolved the publishing world.

Although, initially resistant to ebooks, Mrazaukas began to see their value when it was easier to work with than a 600 page manual. However, he pointed out the irony of how we use symbols like a printed book for icons (same as using an archaic floppy disk as a save icon). “We don’t wait for ourselves to adapt, we just go on, ” he said. (He did point out the FontBook icon evolving from a book to a compass as an example of “getting it” in this regard.)

He also pointed out that analog isn’t even really analog anymore, with printers becoming completely digital (although publishers sticking to industrial standards). And since most everything will eventually go into public domain and be digitalized, there really is not a black and white.

Digitalization can be a good thing though, as its reduced cost can increase access and education. Once educated, individuals will be empowered to buy the physical book.

He ended his talk proposing that books, like experimental film, music and dance, shouldn’t be tied to the limits of telling a story.

“Why should should [the book] be useful? Why should it not be something that plays with your mind?”

Text: Meghan Arnold

typo14-tag3,Set1-0048_AdiStern

Adi Stern: I remember (not)

19. Mai 2014

Adi Stern’s presentation, I Remember (Not), like his approach to design, was all about balance. The Jerusalem-based designer structured his talk around three very different projects ranging from “fun” to “not so fun.” But all beautiful and important.

Adi Stern: I remember (not)

Adi Stern / Photo: ©Sebastian Weiß

Adi Stern‘s presentation, I Remember (Not), like his approach to design, was all about balance. The Jerusalem-based designer structured his talk around three very different projects ranging from “fun” to “not so fun.” But all beautiful and important.

The first project he showed was the logotype for the Design Museum Holon, the only design museum in Israel. The logotype needed to be a symbol of the museum, but not the building itself, the ability to be set in any color, and a trilingual system.

“We wanted to capture the spirit of this building,” Stern explained.

He added that it was an important cultural and political decision to make the system trilingual to include Arabic.

“All scripts have the same visual weight, hierarchy, presence and nature.” he said. This meant designing the Hebrew with a midway x-height, since its a monocase script, to balance with other scripts.

Another visual communication decision was to “use the whole wall as a sign, as a poster” and create a three-dimensional effect painting white arrows onto the white walls. He felt successful with this choice when a contractor called frantically, days before opening, to see when he’d paint the arrows. He knew that by doing something so strange that people noticed it he’d made the right design decision.

The next project was much more somber, but of deep personal importance to Stern, whose mother is a Holocaust survivor. Taking on the project to design the visual communication aspects of Block 27 at Auschwitz Memorial and Museum, Stern was “designing, shaping memory and my own personal roots.”

In addition to the normal design hurdles of any project, the team faced the added challenge that “commemorating the Holocaust is a very complex issue. We wanted to remember the victims and tell a story.” After acknowledging that “it [was] our moral duty to do this project. We [had] to do this project and do it differently,” they set out to create something meaningful and universal to influence visitors through visual communication.

As the exhibition falls at the end of the tour of the site, visitors arrive physically and mentally exhausted. Additionally, the majority of visitors are European youth. The exhibit needed to be designed to generate discussion and reflection for this audience.

They also faced some major dilemmas in design ethics. “There was the gap between the horrific content and the fact that we need to make it look good [visually],” Stern said. “In order to communicate with a young audience, who doesn’t really want to be there, you have to be attractive and contemporary.” Additionally, they needed to create a broad, clear, accessible message without paying the price of generalization. “Graphic design is about generalizing, we do that all the time,” Stern said.

After addressing these challenges, Stern guided the audience through three of the rooms his team designed for the project. With multimedia visuals and sound, the team designed an experience to walk visitors from a room depicting the everyday lives of the Jewish community between the wars, to a room depicting the Nazi ideology with loud noise and video creating a “heavy feel of oppression and stress,” to the “Extermination Room” where there is a “withering silence – the unheard sound of a systematic murdering machine.”

In this last room, the team faced a major design challenge of creating a massive infographic map of Europe to show the killing sites. They modeled it as a “black stain…a non-erasable stain.”

Finally, Stern took on the challenge of designing the book of names, which currently contains over 4.2 million victim names documented over decades. Stern designed it as an “internal tombstone” and created a typeface in three languages and two scripts for the project.

“This was perhaps the most meaningful project I ever did,” he said. “The names of my relatives set in a typeface that I hand-crafted.”

Stern wanted to end his presentation on a more upbeat note, so he focused the final section on the process behind his typeface, Noam, the first typeface with its Hebrew and Latin scripts designed simultaneously. His goal is to create a coherent family that holds each script in balance, yet allows each to function independently.

“Achieving this evenness was my goal,” Stern said.

Text: Meghan Arnold

photo © Gerhard Kassner

Triboro: Under the influence

19. Mai 2014

Design duo, Triboro, has purposely kept their team (made up of husband and wife, Stefanie Weigler and David Heasty), small. “The truth is we are control freaks,” Stefanie said before introducing their presentation, Under the Influence, focused on drawing inspiration from New York City, which she calls “a candy store for designers.”

Triboro: Under the influence

photo © Gerhard Kassner

Design duo, Triboro, has purposely kept their team (made up of husband and wife, Stefanie Weigler and David Heasty), small.

“The truth is we are control freaks,” Stefanie said before introducing their presentation, Under the Influence, focused on drawing inspiration from New York City, which she calls “a candy store for designers.”

New York is reflected in Triboro’s broad portfolio ranging from music packaging to startup brand identity to corporate campaigns to publications to exhibitions to celebrity fashion lines. Although the two have no preconceived notions or house style and approach “each assignment as an opportunity to go on a creative journey,” the city’s impact can be seen in much of their aesthetic.

Focusing on “roots,” the pair explored how New York, with its “geography and people in a state of constant flux,” serves as their muse. They compared the creative process to walking around the city and finding surprises around every corner.

“We identify inspirations in the chaos,” they said.

Triboro draws these inspirations from the high-brow contrast and intrinsic link between commerce and art, as well as the quirky “low-brow” visual landscape of the city, from deli signage to abandoned buildings.

“We design objects that have a sense of history, so people will treat them with respect,” they said, illustrating with examples of a dog-tag influenced William Rast product tag and campaigns for clients like Stella Artois modeled after ghost ads around NYC.

The city doesn’t only influence Triboro, but they question the status quo and influence New York itself. One of their biggest projects was a redesign of the New York subway map. They created a custom typeface for the larger text and used Gotham for the small type. (“Why use a Swiss typeface for an American map?”). Then in “an absurd infographic paradox, after so much care went into the design” they picked a neon red for the color. The creative challenge allowed them to promote the studio, and the buzz they generated from posting the map in subway stations, led to the poster still showing up in lifestyle magazines and a meeting with Massimo Vignelli.

Living in New York, they realize that as designers, they must cut through the chaos by doing something differently for clients. For client, BLK DNM, they created an identity system based on constant repetition, use of limited type/color and presenting the models in an unexpected way. Similarly, for client GQ, they challenged the static grid of a printed magazine and mimicked the digital experience for the printed GQ Style Manual.

The aggregate natural and cultural history of the city influences the look of their projects. A TDC project they did questioned the concept of perfection by mimicking the way weather and age can change design. They drew upon the former cultural grittiness of the East Village to create restaurant and cafe branding for a new luxury hotel in the storied neighborhood. They allow themselves to experiment with these influences too, whether its taking a “fuck readability” attitude toward magazine layout or printing their rejected work as Triboro Leftovers.

Triboro wrapped up their presentation with their Nike-commissioned New York project to design a logo for the city. They wanted to link back to the Nike heritage brand, and initially didn’t want just another typographic representation of New York/NYC/etc. They decided to marry “Just Do It” with Do It Yourself and thus was born the logo, changing Nike into NYC. This allowed customer participation and transforming classic Nike ads into New York-themed ads. The city influencing not only their studio, but a classic American brand.

Text: Meghan Arnold

photo © Gerhard Kassner

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Bärbel Bold: Type & Tech

19. Mai 2014

Bärbel Bold und Ingo Italic sind Letterfriends. Eine langjährige Freundschaft, die in der Zeit der Graffittikunst unter dem Kollektivnamen „Mongomania“ ihren Ursprung fand und heute buchstäblich Früchte in einem 2011 gegründeten „typografischen concept store“ in Kreuzberg trägt.

Bärbel Bold: Type & Tech

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Bärbel Bold und Ingo Italic sind Letterfriends. Eine langjährige Freundschaft, die in der Zeit der Graffittikunst unter dem Kollektivnamen „Mongomania“ ihren Ursprung fand und heute buchstäblich Früchte in einem 2011 gegründeten “typografischen concept store” in Kreuzberg trägt.

„Letters are my friends“

Eine gemütliche Symbiose aus Studio, Showroom, Forschungslab und Eventroom, die von einem interdisziplinären Künstlerkollektiv mit lustigen Namen, schaffenden Enthusiasmus und kompetenten Design- und Technologiekompetenzen genutzt wird. Stets auf der Suche nach spannenden Beziehungen zwischen Typografie und Technik, wollen sie vor allem neue Kontexte erschliessen, neue Wege finden sowie Interaktionen und Erlebnisse im Raum schaffen. So zum Beispiel ergab sich eine bidirektionale Verbindung für die Entwickler von vvvv und LAMF. Der sogenannte „vvvlagshipstore“ wurde ins Leben gerufen und bot eine interessante Promotionplattform für ihr damals noch unbekanntes Softwaretool, das heutzutage Interactiondesignern als unverzichtbares Werkzeug dient.

Keine Typografen – aber leidenschaftliche Spieler – sind sie, die sich mit Hingabe der experimentellen Anwendung von Typografie und dessen konzeptionelle Ausarbeitung widmen. Inspiriert vom audiovisuellen typografischen Synthesizer von Robert Meek und Frank Müller entwarfen sie den „Infinite Typetrooper“. Eine mit einem Display gekoppelte Schreibmaschine, die animierte Buchstaben des typografisch generativen Frameworks „Buchstabengewitter“ abbildet. Überdies stellt Bärbel Bold innovative Inspirationsquellen, wie den car-tracking IQ Font von Toyota, die Graffiti Markup Language, den Open Source Online Typeface Editor prototypo.io und tinkerbot.net vor. Weitere spannende Projekte sind gerne in der jüngst entstandenen LAMF-Fibel mit selbigen Titel des Talks „Keep Tha Kerning Tight“ zu entdecken.

www.lettersaremyfriends.com

Text: Lisa Schmidt

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Florian Pfeffer: To Do – Strategien, Werkzeuge und Geschäftsmodelle für radikale Gestaltung

19. Mai 2014

In seinem Vortrag stellte Florian Pfeffer sein brandneues Buch »To Do – Strategien, Werkzeuge und Geschäftsmodelle für radikale Gestaltung« vor und gab Einblicke in die Themen dahinter.

Florian Pfeffer: To Do – Strategien, Werkzeuge und Geschäftsmodelle für radikale Gestaltung

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

In seinem Vortrag stellte Florian Pfeffer sein brandneues Buch »To Do – Strategien, Werkzeuge und Geschäftsmodelle für radikale Gestaltung« vor und gab Einblicke in die Themen dahinter. Er selbst hat seine Wurzeln klar im Printdesign, vornehmlich Buchgestaltung. Das im Verlag Hermann Schmidt Mainz erschienene Werk stellt nun sein Debüt als Autor dar. Drei Jahre recherchierte und schrieb er an dem Buch, eine Zeit, die für ihn eine Art Selbsterkenntnisprozess darstellte, denn er hoffte, durch die Arbeit sich selbst die Fragen beantworten zu können, die sich ihm im Bezug auf die Zukunft von Design stellten. Seiner Meinung nach befindet sich das heutige Design in einem Wandlungs- oder Häutungsprozess, den er gerne analysieren und für sich greifbar machen wollte.

Für ihn übertragen sich die gesellschaftlichen Wandlungen, die sich oft in einem Wechsel von zentralistischen in dezentral strukturierte Systeme zeigen, auch auf das Design. In Zukunft werden immer mehr Grafiker als Einzelkämpfer auftreten – die aber allesamt trotzdem viel bewegen können. Mit vielen kleinen Aktionen können sich große Veränderungen herbeiführen lassen und das Design oder der Designer kann hier eine entscheidende Rolle spielen, gerade im Hinblick auf die soziale Verantwortung.

Das Buch behandelt das Thema anhand 50 ausgewählter Projekte und Phänomene, die einerseits präsentiert und andererseits in Strategie, Werkzeuge und Geschäftsmodelle aufgeschlüsselt, analysiert werden.

Text: Leon Howahr, slanted

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Drury Brennan: Calligraphic Letter Abstraction

19. Mai 2014

Der „Calligraphic Letter Abstraction“-Workshop vermittelte Einsichten in die Methode der typografischen Abstraktion des Schriftkünstlers Drury Brennan – mit Live-Demo und Fragerunde.

Drury Brennan: Calligraphic Letter Abstraction

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Der „Calligraphic Letter Abstraction“-Workshop vermittelte Einsichten in die Methode der typografischen Abstraktion des Schriftkünstlers Drury Brennan – mit Live-Demo und Fragerunde.

Drury Brennens jüngstes typografisches Projekt handelt von der Fusion all dieser Inspirationen in einer neuen ästhetischen Poesie. Aktuell lebt und arbeitet der amerikanische Kalligraf in Berlin. Seine Werke wurden in Chongqing, China, Berlin und Venedig gezeigt. Seine erste große Solo-Show eröffnet im September 2014 im Chicago Cultural Center.

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Hakobo: TypoPolo

19. Mai 2014

Auf der Stage endet die Typo Berlin 2014 mit Jakob Stępień, bekannter unter Hakobo. Beeinflusst durch die polnische Plakatkunst und kombiniert mit zeitgenössischer Kunst entwirft Hakobo vor allem im Grenzbereich von Kunst und Design, Kulturplakate und visual Identity und arbeitet mit vielen kulturellen Einrichtungen zusammen.

Hakobo: TypoPolo

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Auf der Stage endet die Typo Berlin 2014 mit Jakob Stępień, bekannter unter Hakobo. Beeinflusst durch die polnische Plakatkunst und kombiniert mit zeitgenössischer Kunst entwirft Hakobo vor allem im Grenzbereich von Kunst und Design, Kulturplakate und visual Identity und arbeitet mit vielen kulturellen Einrichtungen zusammen.

Nach einer kurzen Einführung in die Bedeutung und Entwicklung der Kunstszene seiner Geburtsstadt Łódź und anschließend seiner Arbeit, ging es weiter mit seinem aktuellen Projekt – Typopolo. Selbst gemachte Parkschilder, Angebote im Supermarkt oder kreative Wegbeschreibungen. Hakobo untersuchte die Straßen Polens, sammelte die kreativen Potenziale von Leuten ohne jegliche Designkenntnisse und zeigte die verschiedensten Techniken und natürlich die beliebtesten Fonts dieser Artworks, in denen Helvetica ganz oben auf der Liste steht. “Typo Polo sounds like a DiscoPolo”

Zu sehen ist diese Sammlung außerdem aktuell bis zum 15. Juni im Modern Art Museum in Warschau.

Text: Ceren Bulut, slanted

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Foto © Sebastian Weiß

Foto © Gerhard Kassner

Thomas Manss: Ordnung & Eccentricity

18. Mai 2014

In weltmännischer Manier begrüßte uns Thomas Manss zu seinem Talk: »Willkommen in der Welt der Thomas Manss & Company, wo Designer und Webentwickler so höflich sind wie die Briten, so präzise wie die Deutschen, so flexibel wie die Brasilianer und so präsentabel wie die Italiener.«

Thomas Manss: Ordnung & Eccentricity

Foto © Gerhard Kassner

In weltmännischer Manier begrüßte uns Thomas Manss zu seinem Talk: »Willkommen in der Welt der Thomas Manss & Company, wo Designer und Webentwickler so höflich sind wie die Briten, so präzise wie die Deutschen, so flexibel wie die Brasilianer und so präsentabel wie die Italiener.«

1993 wurde die Agentur Thomas Manss & Company gegründet und besteht nun aus rund 20 Mitarbeitern verteilt auf vier Standorten (Berlin, London, Rio de Janeiro und Florenz).

Designer aus aller Herren Länder für internationale Unternehmen

Thomas Manss, aus dem Ort Gütersloh in Ostwestfalen stammend, suchte – wie in dem kurz eingespielten Schlager mit Lokalkolorit – »die Freiheit irgendwo – irgendwo« und ist heute ein Global Player.

»Von Erik Spiekermann habe ich alles gelernt was ich heute über Typografie weiß – von Allen Fletcher habe ich gelernt, alles zu vergessen was ich über Typografie weiß.«

Von Meta Design nach Sedley Place Design schließlich zu Pentagram in London, begab sich Thomas Manss auf den steilen Pfad seiner Karriere. Durch Allen Fletcher wurde sein Denken und Arbeiten als Designer, der mit den Mitteln der Rastergestaltung und Typografie ein Layout erarbeitet, komplett in Frage gestellt: »Thomas, this is all about ideas. We don’t want to get caught in typography«, zitiert er Flechter. Im Laufe der Zeit habe er jedoch gelernt, dass man beides braucht: Manchmal mehr Deutsche Ordnung und manchmal mehr Englischen Witz.

»Einfachheit lässt sich nur durch harte Arbeit erreichen.«

Für seiner Auftraggeber entwickelt Thomas Manss Logos, die wie ein Destillat die Essenz der Corporate Identities ausdrücken, Aufhänger seien für die Unternehmen und Geschichten erzählen.

Es folgen eine ganze Reihe Logos, Wortmarken und Signets – manche davon können in ihrer knappen Form mehrere Bedeutungen und Metaphern abbilden, wie die Pakete/Pfeile für ein Logistik-Unternehmen. Die Geschichten, die Thomas Manss über seine Auftraggeber erzählen kann, zeugen davon wie intensiv sich der Designer mit diesen auseinandersetzt haben muss.

»Das Channel Logo riecht auch nur so gut wie das Parfum für das es steht.«

Am Anfang des gestalterischen Prozesses sollte man sehr viel lernen und die richtigen Fragen stellen – manchmal auch unbequeme und das möglichst höflich, so Manss, dessen Auftritt und Humor sehr britisch anmutet. Besonders wenn es um Namensfindung gehe, kann man einem Unternehmen keine Werte oder Tonalität überstülpen. Seine Formel: »Wenn der Name Ausgangspunkt und das Logo der Aufhänger eines Unternehmens ist, dann ist Corporate Identity die gesamte Handlung mit allen Charakteren.« Authentizität und Originalität seien wichtig für eine glaubwürdige Unternehmenspersönlichkeit und diese müsste sich ein Unternehmen schon verdienen.

Viele Luxusmarken befinden sich unter den gezeigten Referenzen seiner Agentur, aber auch Kulturmarken begeben sich vertrauensvoll in die Hände des Designers. Für seine Auftraggeber entstehen ordentlich wie hochwertig anmutende Erscheinungsbilder und Websites bis exzentrisch gestaltete Kampagnen, Bücher und Magazine.

Thomas Manss zitiert einen Designkritiker: »Thomas Manss ist nicht nur Designer, sondern Geschichtenerzähler, Fantast, Märchenonkel und Mythenmacher.«

Text: Christine Wenning

 

 

 

 

DSC_0248

Neue Typografie für die Heilige Schrift

18. Mai 2014

Prof. Dirk Fütterer vom Fachbereich Gestaltung der Fachhochschule Bielefeld und zwei Studenten – Arne Vogt und Clarissa Becker, Mitglieder des Instituts für Buchgestaltung präsentierten am Freitag das Buch der Bücher – ihr seit 5 Jahren andauerndes Projekt – die »Bielefelder Bibel«, der Neugestaltung der Bibel.

Neue Typografie für die Heilige Schrift

Prof. Dirk Fütterer vom Fachbereich Gestaltung der Fachhochschule Bielefeld und zwei Studenten – Arne Vogt und Clarissa Becker, Mitglieder des Instituts für Buchgestaltung präsentierten am Freitag das Buch der Bücher – ihr seit 5 Jahren andauerndes Projekt – die »Bielefelder Bibel«, der Neugestaltung der Bibel.

Die Bibel neu gestalten? Das ist schon ein wahnwitziges Mamutprojekt, wie kommt man darauf?  

Als »Telefonbuch« und »Einschlafhilfe« ist die Bibel in ihrer heutigen Form als ökonomisiertes Massenprodukt auf Dünndruckpapier, eng und 2-spaltig gesetzt kein großes Lesevergnügen, so Dirk Fütterer. Zuerst sei es eine spannende typografische Herausforderung gewesen einzelne Bücher zu gestalten, die Dirk Fütterer seinen Studenten in Seminaren gestellt hat. Auf der Frankfurter Buchmesse hatte der Herder Verlag großes Interesse daran und das Projekt begann sich als Idee zu festigen.

Warum sollte man die Bibel lesen?

Abgesehen von religiösen Motiven, gibt es in der Bibel viele Geschichten in unterschiedlichen literarischen Gattungen: von Gesetzestexten zu sagenhaften Erzählungen, Drama, Poesie und Briefen. 73 Bücher geschrieben und editiert von verschiedenen Personen und schließlich in über 2.000 Sprachen übersetzt sind zusammen ein Werk epischen Ausmaßes, welches nachhaltig unsere Kultur und Sprache geprägt hat. Bis heute ist es das meist verkaufte Buch der Welt.

Wie kann man die Bibel lesbarer machen?

Zusammen mit der Exegetin Dr. Theol. Melanie Peetz von der Hochschule St. Georgen wurden die Bücher exegetisch-literaturwissenschaftlich analysiert und in Gattungen eingeordnet. Auf dieser Grundlage gestalten mittlerweile seit 5 Jahren über 50 Studenten die einzelnen Bücher der Bibel mit der Vorgabe eines festen Formates und mit einer Schriftsippe (FF Nexus von Martin Major.

»Rein typografisch, ohne Bilder oder Dekoration wird die wortgewaltige Sprache der Bibel sichtbar gemacht«, so Dirk Fütterer. Dabei gelte es die Balance zwischen theoretisch fundierter, sezierender Gestaltung und einer der Lesbarkeit zuträglichen Gestaltung zu finden. Das sei nicht immer einfach, einige Bücher werden im Laufe der Zeit nach aktuelleren Exegesen überarbeitet.

In 5 Bändern wurde die »Bielefelder Bibel« nun aufgeteilt, nach literarischer Einordnung. Einen Gesamteinband für dieses Werk zu produzieren, würde nicht mehr praktikabel sein und mehrere Kilos wiegen.

Wie geht es weiter? 

Ein passender Verlag für die Produktion der »Bielefelder Bibel« ist noch nicht endgültig gefunden. Derzeit laufe das Projekt weiter und soll nächstes Jahr in einer kleineren Auflage gedruckt werden. Das Institut für Buchgestaltung freut sich über Leser, die die »Bielefelder Bibel« testen und ist gespannt auf das Feedback, um das Projekt weiterzubringen.

Für mehr Informationen:

www.bielefelder-bibel.de

Text und Foto: Christine Wenning