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PanTuNieStal

Justyna Burzyńska, Maciej Lebiedowicz

Pan tu nie stał is a fashion label based in Łódź, the former capital of the textiles industry where the total production for the brand takes place. This brand uses retro motifs from Polish visual and linguistic culture which appeared to enchant the young generation. It’s run by Justyna Burzyńska (1979) – a sociologist and Maciej Lebiedowicz (1982) – a graphic designer. In 2006 they decided to set up a blog presenting their private collection of Polish graphic designs from the communist era. In 2008 they opened an online shop with first productions made for PTNS label: t-shirts with prints resembling the past design style. Now they run a business which has become one of the trendiest brands for young generation. In 2012 Pan tu nie stał was awarded Bronze prize during European Design Festival for Brand Implementation.

Talk: English
               
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Pan tu nie stał (You were not standing here!)

TYPO Berlin 2013TYPO Berlin 2013, 18.05.2013, 16:00 Uhr (Stage)

The aesthetics of the “Pan tu nie stał” designer clothing brand was formed, on the one hand, by the gray tedium and shortages of the Communist era in Poland, and, on the other, by the high-quality designs which stood out against this mundane background – the illustrations, books, posters and packaging that were created during this period. The deficient means available to designers meant that they were compelled to seek unusual solutions which, when combined with artistic talent, resulted in extremely memorable designs. Ten years after Poland regained its freedom, anyone with access to a computer could become a graphic designer. Polish reality became a chaotic motley due to an excess of means of expression.

Nostalgia for the visual aesthetics of Communist times induced us to create our own interpretation of the former approach to design. It was very difficult at the beginning – half of our t-shirts ended up ruined, and we gave them away to our friends to use as pajamas. Our evolution from two weirdos who collected “curiosities” for our blog to a company with several employees, which cooperates with a dozen or so designers (including top designers in their thirties), which produces items worn by twenty-year-olds in big cities and sells five tons of clothes per year, was slow. A peculiarity of the brand is the impossibility of translating its specific character into a foreign language. This stems from a fascination with old-fashioned Polish language, which, used in new ways, gains fresh meaning that is stripped of its original context.